LATEST NEWS

DataBank Establishes $725M Financing Facility to Support Growth. Read the press release.

Get a Quote

Request a Quote

Tell us about your infrastructure requirements and how to reach you, and one of team members will be in touch shortly.

Schedule a Tour

Tour Our Facilities

Let us know which data center you'd like to visit and how to reach you, and one of team members will be in touch shortly.

Get a Quote

Request a Quote

Tell us about your infrastructure requirements and how to reach you, and one of team members will be in touch shortly.

Schedule a Tour

Tour Our Facilities

Let us know which data center you'd like to visit and how to reach you, and one of team members will be in touch shortly.

Get a Quote

Request a Quote

Tell us about your infrastructure requirements and how to reach you, and one of team members will be in touch shortly.

Schedule a Tour

Tour Our Facilities

Let us know which data center you'd like to visit and how to reach you, and one of team members will be in touch shortly.

Getting Started With Data Centers: Essential Tips for Beginners

Getting Started With Data Centers: Essential Tips for Beginners


Data centers are now firmly established as a key part of modern business operations. Moreover, their role looks set to grow and branch out in new directions. With that in mind, here is a quick guide to what you need to know when getting started with data centers.

Understanding data centers

A data center is a facility used to house the infrastructure and equipment needed to collect, process, store, and/or disseminate data. Its size will reflect the type and volume of work it does.

At one end of the scale, there are massive data centers that literally cover hundreds of thousands of square feet. These data centers are often known as hyperscale data centers. They tend to be run by global corporations and can undertake highly complex processing on significant volumes of data.

At the other end of the scale, there are small data centers placed near where data is generated and/or used. These data centers are often known as edge data centers. They are used by organizations of all sizes for simple processing tasks on relatively low volumes of data.

Options for accessing data center infrastructure

There are basically two ways for organizations to access data center infrastructure. The first is for them to deploy and run their own data centers. The second is to access data center infrastructure run by a third-party vendor.

Colocation vendors run managed data centers where clients deploy and manage their own equipment. Public cloud service providers (CSPs) run data centers as a necessary part of offering infrastructure, platforms and/or software as a service.

Both of these options have the benefit of convenience and also tend to be very cost-effective. In particular, they eliminate the need for significant up-front investment.

Choosing the right data center provider

The starting point for choosing the right data center provider is much the same as the starting point for choosing any vendor. In other words, you need to define your high-level goals and objectives and your specific needs, wants and budget. In addition to these specific factors, there are five broader factors you should consider.

Location: Consider the geographical location of the data center in relation to your organization’s operations. Proximity to your users can impact latency and network performance, while being situated in areas less prone to natural disasters enhances reliability.

Security and compliance: Assess the security protocols implemented by the provider, including physical security (e.g., access controls, surveillance), cybersecurity measures (e.g., firewalls, intrusion detection systems), and compliance with industry standards and compliance programs(e.g., ISO 27001, SOC 2, GDPR).

Cost and pricing structure: Evaluate the overall cost of services, including upfront fees, recurring charges, and any additional costs for bandwidth, power usage, or supplementary services. Compare pricing structures and billing models to ensure transparency and cost-effectiveness over the long term.

Service level agreements (SLAs): Review the SLAs provided by the data center provider, including guarantees for uptime, performance metrics (e.g., latency, packet loss), and response/resolution times for support issues. Ensure that SLAs align with your organization’s requirements and risk tolerance.

Vendor reputation: Check what other customers (past and present) have to say about the vendor and their service. In particular, try to find out about the offboarding experience. Quite simply, a vendor who supports customers when they are leaving is likely to be a vendor who supports customers when they are arriving and when they are staying.

Basic troubleshooting tips for data center operations

No matter how well run a data center is, there are bound to be challenges from time to time. With that in mind, here are five troubleshooting tips for data center operations.

Establish monitoring systems: Implement comprehensive monitoring tools to track key metrics such as temperature, humidity, power usage, and network performance. Proactive monitoring helps identify potential issues before they escalate, enabling timely intervention to prevent downtime or equipment failures.

Implement comprehensive logging and auditing: Configure logging and auditing systems to record detailed information about system events, error messages, and user activities within the data center environment. Analyzing logs can provide valuable insights into the sequence of events leading up to an issue, helping to pinpoint the root cause more efficiently.

Document procedures and configurations: Maintain detailed documentation of data center configurations, equipment layouts, and standard operating procedures (SOPs). This documentation serves as a reference guide for troubleshooting and ensures consistency in response to common issues, reducing human error and minimizing resolution time.

Follow a methodical approach: Adopt a systematic approach to troubleshooting that involves gathering relevant information, isolating the problem scope, and testing hypotheses to identify the root cause. Use tools like network analyzers, diagnostic utilities, and remote management consoles to aid in the troubleshooting process.

Collaborate with vendor support: Establish relationships with equipment vendors and leverage their technical support resources when troubleshooting complex issues. Vendor support teams can provide expertise, diagnostics tools, and firmware/software updates tailored to specific hardware or software components. This can significantly accelerate problem resolution and ensure compatibility with recommended configurations.

Share Article



Categories

Related Resources

Data Centers 101
Blog Article
Data Centers 101: A Beginner’s Guide To Understanding Core Concepts

Explore the world of data centers from a beginner’s perspective. Gain an understanding of the core concepts in data centers. Find out what data centers are and how they can be implemented. Learn about their core components and their importance in IT infrastructure. Discover what uptime means in practice.

White Paper
An Effective Data Center Partnership Guide

Strategic, Technical, and Future alignment gives you the best possible data center experience today and tomorrow.

Colocation Agreement
Blog Article
7 Steps To Setting Up A Colocation Agreement

Discover the 7 key steps for an effective colocation agreement setup. From defining business needs to finalizing legal terms, this guide ensures a strategic approach. Maximize the benefits of colocation with this comprehensive roadmap.

Discover the DataBank Difference

Discover the DataBank Difference

Explore the eight critical factors that define our Data Center Evolved approach and set us apart from other providers.
Download Now
Get Started

Get Started

Discover the DataBank Difference today:
Hybrid infrastructure solutions with boundless edge reach and a human touch.

Get A Quote

Request a Quote

Tell us about your infrastructure requirements and how to reach you, and one of the team members will be in touch.

Schedule a Tour

Tour Our Facilities

Let us know which data center you’d like to visit and how to reach you, and one of the team members will be in touch shortly.